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Stephan Pastis

by Admin on October 24, 2014

Stephan Pastis

Stephan Pastis

When: Friday 14 November, from 11:30am.

Where: Liberty Hall.

Dublin Book Festival are delighted to welcome international bestselling cartoonist Stephan Pastis to the festival.

Stephan Pastis is the creator of Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made and its sequels, Timmy Failure: Now Look What You’ve Done and Timmy Failure: We Meet Again, as well as Pearls Before Swine, an acclaimed comic strip that appears in more than seven hundred newspapers worldwide, including UK editions of MetroTimmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made was named Best Story Book at the Booktrust Best Book Awards in 2014 and is translated into over 30 languages. Join Stephan as he explains his greatest creation in this hilarious, Ireland-exclusive event.

 

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DBF Interviews: Sarah Davis-Goff

by Admin on October 23, 2014

Sarah Davis-Goff

Sarah Davis-Goff

Sarah Davis-Goff, co-founder of Tramp Press, will be participating on one of our panels as part of our Meet The Publishers and Agents event on Sunday, 16 November. Here we discussed her experiences in the publishing industry and the ambitious future of Tramp Press.

 

 

Q: Having worked in New York, London and Dublin with various publishing companies, including Penguin and The Lilliput Press, you’ve considerable experience in the industry, so has co-founding Tramp Press been what you expected it to be?

Happily, my experiences in setting up Tramp Press with my business partner, Lisa Coen, have been really the best-case scenario of what I was expecting. Apart from the fact that we love what we do, working with Lisa is always inspiring, and we have a lot of fun. We were also really lucky in that Donal Ryan starting becoming a big name just as we were launching, and we got lots of interest just because of that. Our team – our publicist, Peter O’Connell, our designers, our typesetter – are wonderfully talented. So much depended on how other people in the Arts receive us and thank goodness we’ve had nothing but encouragement and support which has really meant a lot. The biggest risk I think was the assumption we made when we were setting up as a publisher that the talent would be out there, and, happily, it really is. The country is awash with literary talent.

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DBF Interviews: Peter Murphy

by Admin on October 21, 2014

Peter Murphy

Peter Murphy

Next up in our series of interviews is journalist and author Peter Murphy, whose novel Shall We Gather at the River was published by Faber & Faber last year. A contributor to Dubliners 100, Peter will be at DBF Saturday, 15 November.

Q: Can you explain the genesis of the Dubliners 100 project? How did you get involved?

Lisa Coen from Tramp contacted me about a year ago and told me about Thomas Morris’s evil plan to desecrate Joyce’s legacy, of which I wholeheartedly approved. There was a wee bit of a scramble as authors swarmed all over their favourite stories. I was slow off the mark and got lumbered with the dunce’s prize: a mandate to rewrite (or ‘cover’ in Tom’s parlance), the greatest short story ever written. Ulp, says I. I chewed on the idea of ‘The Dead’ for a while. Then I thought about the idea of Tramp Press itself. Then I took the dog for a walk around the wasteland at Wexford harbour, and I imagined a bunch of hobos sitting around in a sort of war-torn wasteland where the only story left intact was ‘The Dead’, and I imagined the kind of arguments these jackdaw folk might have had around the tar-barrel at night. I sent on a draft to Tramp and they liked it and asked me to extend it. I wrote it for fun, with no thought of consequence. Tramp are brilliant to work with. Total manga warrioresses.

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DBF Interviews: Rob Doyle

by Admin on October 9, 2014

Rob Doyle

Rob Doyle

For our third author interview we talked to Rob Doyle, whose debut novel Here Are the Young Men was published by Lilliput Press earlier this year, about his approach to writing, writers he admires and his plans for the future. Rob will be participating in RTÉ Radio 1’s Arena Live Show.

Q: ‘Here Are The Young Men‘ is very much a novel about Ireland in a particular time: can you give us a brief overview of it and whether or not you think it has anything to say about the Ireland of today?

It’s about four young friends in Dublin who are epically pissed-off and become consumed by drugs, drink, nihilism and recreational atrocity. The novel takes place over a single summer: we watch as Matthew and the others are led into committing acts of cruelty and destruction by the malevolent Kearney, whose chief passions are hardcore porn, 9/11 footage, hash and Grand Theft Auto.

The novel does have a lot to say about contemporary Ireland. Like most novels, however, it offers a particular perspective on the society it depicts, rather than trying to account for the whole thing. The raw material of this novel is casual drug use, hard drinking, confused and excruciating sexuality, the loathing of youth for institutions which have lost legitimacy, suicide, violence, and a pervading sense of nihilistic despair. Not everyone in Ireland thinks much about these things or feels that they constitute contemporary Irish experience, but many do, and they will recognize a familiar social and existential landscape in Here Are the Young Men. For everyone else, there are plenty of sex jokes.

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DBF Interviews: Donal Ryan

by Admin on October 1, 2014

Donal Ryan

Donal Ryan

DBF opens with an evening celebrating Lines of Vision, Thames and Hudson’s illustrated anthology marking 150 years of the National Gallery of Ireland. For our second author interview, we talk to Donal Ryan, who will be one of four contributing authors discussing the project at our opening night.

Q: Can you explain your involvement in the Lines of Vision Project? Was the integration of visual art and the written word a natural one for you?

Janet McLean rang and explained the project and it sounded really interesting. I felt very honoured to be invited to participate. It was just what I needed at the time, too, as I was struggling to get into the swing of short stories. A 1,000 word fictional reaction to a piece of art from the National Gallery sounded like a lovely kick-start. Or a re-start; I’d written a few stories and was unsure about them, and was heading for that old paralysis.

The integration of visual art and the written word seemed completely natural; I’ve always loved the stories in and behind pieces of art. An object in stasis, a single scene, that can represent, or  be in itself, a complete narrative (if narrative can ever be said to be complete) is a magical thing, the power behind its creation almost supernatural.

The first painting that came to my mind as Janet spoke about the anthology was Erskine Nichol’s An Ejected Family. I think I first saw it in a history book in secondary school. It’s got such power, so much going on: the rack-rented homestead, the barely-seen bailiff and his flinging arm, the desultory rain. The three generations cast out, the old man’s resignation, the young man’s defiant pose. What just happened? What the hell are they going to do? You look at the painting, and worry, and wonder about them, and your heart is heavy for them, and the legions like them.

I just got a copy of the anthology in the post yesterday, actually, and it’s an incredibly beautiful thing. Janet’s done an amazing job. I’m planning on buying loads of them for Christmas presents.

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DBF Interviews: Sara Baume

by Admin on September 25, 2014

Sara Baume

Sara Baume

In addition to our Publisher Interview Series, we’ll also be posting interviews with participating authors. First up is the winner of the 2014 Davy Byrnes Short Story Award, Sara Baume.

Q: Can you share a little bit about Solesearcher1, your award-winning story? Even though it is set in Ireland, do you see the story as a piece of ‘Irish writing’?

The protagonist is a woman called Phil, and the only other significant character is her father, Phil Snr. The title is taken from the alias she uses on an internet forum for sea anglers. The story is driven by her quest to catch a Dover sole which, even though they’re common in Irish waters, are almost impossible to catch from the shore. There are a few other strands: a sequence of missing dogs, the looming threat of a flooded house. I can’t say I see any piece of writing in terms of nationality, though I expect that everything I’ve written and will write is irresistibly informed by an Irish perspective, even if it isn’t set here.

Q: How would you describe the contemporary Irish literary scene?

The Irish ‘scene’ seems to me pretty lively at the moment; there are some great festivals, journals, independent bookshops and publishing houses. As a ‘young’ writer, there are plenty of opportunities to get work published in some form or another, but it’s still incredibly difficult to sustain a career.

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National Gallery of Ireland col © NGIWhen: Thursday 13 November, from 6.30pm – 8.15pm 

Where: The National Gallery of Ireland, Merrion Square W, Dublin 2

Cost: €10/€7 concession

The Dublin Book Festival opens with an evening celebrating Lines of Vision (Thames and Hudson), a beautifully illustrated anthology published to mark 150 years of the National Gallery of Ireland. The book features new work by fifty-six acclaimed IrishZurich writers. Join Seán Rocks of RTÉ Radio 1’s Arena as he talks to four of the contributing authors – Alex Barclay, Kevin Barry, John Boyne and Donal Ryan – about their stories and the works of art that inspired them. Followed by a wine reception in the National Gallery.

BOOK NOW

Tickets also on sale at National Gallery shop: (01) 663 3518

Dublin Book Festival 2014 Launch Event

by Admin on September 1, 2014

We are delighted to be teaming up with The National Gallery of Ireland for our opening event this year.

The Dublin Book Festival opens with an evening celebrating Lines of Vision (Thames and Hudson), a beautifully illustrated anthology published to mark 150 years of the National Gallery of Ireland. The book features new work by fifty-six acclaimed Irish writers. Join Seán Rocks of RTÉ Radio 1’s Arena as he talks to four of the contributing authors – Alex Barclay, Kevin Barry, John Boyne and Donal Ryan – about their stories and the works of art that inspired them.
Followed by a wine reception in The National Gallery.

For bookings: Book Online here 

Tickets also on sale at National Gallery shop: (01) 663 3518

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Volunteers for DBF2014

by Admin on August 15, 2014

As one of Ireland’s most successful and vibrant annual book festivals, we are once again seeking volunteers to help us showcase and support Irish Publishers, authors, and editors, during the different events across our programme.

If you are interested in volunteering with the festival in 2014, please download and complete the DBF14 Volunteer Form here and return to info@dublinbookfestival.com.

We look forward to meeting everyone in November!

 

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logonewFor the second interview in our Publisher Interview Series we talk to Mary Feehan, MD of Mercier Press, Ireland’s oldest independent publishing house.

Q: As a publishing house, 2014 marks your 70th anniversary: as well as being a remarkable achievement, this offers you a unique insight into the publishing industry within Ireland. What changes have you noticed during that time? What changes would you like to see in the future?

There have been huge changes in production methods from metal typesetting which is how we set all of our books when I first began to work at Mercier. Printing was a highly skilled craft and typesetters had to learn that craft through a long apprenticeship. Now people can publish their own books online with the press of a button. It’s wonderful that the market has opened up so much but it was sad to see such a craft disappear. There are also many more bookshops and publishers in Ireland now which contributes to a diverse and interesting publishing industry. Thankfully the Irish love to read Irish books so we continue to have a wide audience.

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