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Dublin Book Festival 2014 Launch Event

by Admin on September 1, 2014

We are delighted to be teaming up with The National Gallery of Ireland for our opening event this year.

The Dublin Book Festival opens with an evening celebrating Lines of Vision (Thames and Hudson), a beautifully illustrated anthology published to mark 150 years of the National Gallery of Ireland. The book features new work by fifty-six acclaimed Irish writers. Join Seán Rocks of RTÉ Radio 1′s Arena as he talks to four of the contributing authors – Alex Barclay, Kevin Barry, John Boyne and Donal Ryan – about their stories and the works of art that inspired them.
Followed by a wine reception in The National Gallery.

For bookings: http://www.eventbrite.ie/e/lines-of-vision-dublin-book-festival-in-association-with-national-gallery-of-ireland-sean-rocks-tickets-12738433999?aff=es2&rank=2

Tickets also on sale at National Gallery shop: (01) 663 3518

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Volunteers for DBF2014

by Admin on August 15, 2014

As one of Ireland’s most successful and vibrant annual book festivals, we are once again seeking volunteers to help us showcase and support Irish Publishers, authors, and editors, during the different events across our programme.

If you are interested in volunteering with the festival in 2014, please send an email to us at info@dublinbookfestival.com

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logonewFor the second interview in our Publisher Interview Series we talk to Mary Feehan, MD of Mercier Press, Ireland’s oldest independent publishing house.

Q: As a publishing house, 2014 marks your 70th anniversary: as well as being a remarkable achievement, this offers you a unique insight into the publishing industry within Ireland. What changes have you noticed during that time? What changes would you like to see in the future?

There have been huge changes in production methods from metal typesetting which is how we set all of our books when I first began to work at Mercier. Printing was a highly skilled craft and typesetters had to learn that craft through a long apprenticeship. Now people can publish their own books online with the press of a button. It’s wonderful that the market has opened up so much but it was sad to see such a craft disappear. There are also many more bookshops and publishers in Ireland now which contributes to a diverse and interesting publishing industry. Thankfully the Irish love to read Irish books so we continue to have a wide audience.

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In the first of our Publisher Interview Series, we talk to the founding Editor of The Stinging Fly Press, Declan Meade.

Q: As a publisher, The Stinging Fly Press has been around for just under a decade now, achieving great success with the likes of Kevin Barry, Mary Costello, and most recently Colin Barrett: what changes have you noticed in the publishing industry in Ireland during that time? What changes would you like to see in the future?

I think publishing is a lot more lively here now than it was ten years ago and this is on account of new publishers arriving on the scene and also, in some cases, new people coming on board at the existing houses. There are now more publishers producing not just more books but a wider range of books. That has to be good for writers and for readers.

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Publisher Interview Series

by Admin on July 25, 2014

This year, in the run-up to Dublin Book Festival 2014, we will be conducting a number of interviews with various authors and publishers, with the aim of giving a better understanding into the workings of the publishing industry in Ireland.

To start with, we will be talking to different Irish Publishers over the next few weeks, showcasing their ethos as a press and asking for their insights into the current climate of Irish publishing and also what advice they would offer to budding authors.

The first of these interviews will be online at the end of next week.

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Programme 2014

by Admin on June 18, 2014

Details will be coming in September 2014!

 

 

Whenever a critic writes about the short-story form, they seem to always begin by saying, “There’s a dearth of critical study on short stories.” And if we’re comparing them to novels—which always seems to be the case—perhaps it’s true. But if you look hard enough, there’s actually a hell of a lot written about the short-story form. Granted, it’s mostly precious stuff about it being a “higher” Art than the Novel, and then some deathly-dull thing about short stories being connected with the “oral tradition”—but it’s not a critically-neglected form. It’s just a form in need of new critical ideas.

As a reader and writer, I see myself primarily as a short-story person. I become very quiet when I’m amongst a group of people talking about novels and novelists. For a long time, I thought it was testament to something lacking in me—that I surely couldn’t be interested enough in books if I hadn’t read seventy-eight John Updike novels. And the feeling remained for a long time: how could I even begin the journey to identify as a writer if I didn’t read all these books that other people were telling me were so great?

But I’ve had my counselling sessions and I’ve arrived at a belief that feels both banal and true: sometimes we need short stories and sometimes we need novels. Frank O’Connor, in The Lonely Voice (sigh; another reference to that bloody book), speaks of people reading novels to assuage loneliness. In contrast, he says, people come to short stories to confront their loneliness. (A typical O’Connor dichotomy: sensible-sounding at first, but increasingly—and fruitfully—problematic on reflection.) He then goes on to talk specifically about what short stories do and, in trying to characterize their essential activity, he quotes Pascal—“the eternal silence of those infinite spaces frighten me”. It’s a knotty quotation, and one I’ve struggled to understand for a long time.

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DBF at The Dublin Writers Festival

by Admin on May 16, 2014

MIKE MCCORMACK & NUALA NÍ CHONCHÚIR – THE ART OF THE SHORT STORY

  • Date: Thu May 22 / 1pm
  • Venue: Smock Alley Theatre
  • Price: €5

We are kicking things off for the 2014 festivities with our short story event with Mike McCormack and Nuala Ní Chonchúir, which takes place at the always excellent Dublin Writers Festival!

 

For more details about the event, go to http://www.dublinwritersfestival.com/event/mike-mccormack-nuala-ni-chonchuir-the-art-of-the-short-story/ 

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In Pictures: Dublin Book Festival 2013

by Admin on November 28, 2013

The 8th Dublin Book Festival took place between Thursday, November 14 through Sunday, November 17, 2013 at Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar as well as satellite venues around the city including: The Gutter Bookshop, The Irish Writers’ Centre, National Library of Ireland and Dublin County Libraries.

Special thanks to all the authors, publishers, sponsors and volunteers who worked so hard to make this year’s Festival a huge success!

Here is a selection of photographs from this year’s festival.  To see more, click here and visit our Facebook page to view YOUR photos. Photography by Pedro Giaquinto.

Enjoy!

Dublin Book Festival Opening Night Highlights. Listen to this ARENA interview on RTE Radio 1 on the 29th of November 2013.  

Opening Night#14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thank You!

by Admin on November 28, 2013

Frank McGuinness

Frank McGuinness

Dublin Book Festival 2013 has passed, and with the majority of our events booking out, it was our most successful to date. For four days authors, readers – both young and old, publishers and aspiring writers gathered together and shared their love of words and books. It was such an honour to have so many talented writers discuss their work, inspiration and passion for writing.

It was a joy to see children lounging on beanbags listening to stories told to them by the authors themselves and taking a stab at writing their own stories.

It was a festival of words and ideas, laughter and imagination. I hope you were as inspired as we were.

I would like to thank everyone involved, the DBF committee who give up their valuable time throughout the year to work on the festival, the DBF team for their dedication and hard work, the wonderful volunteers, the publishers who came from around the country to support their writers, and finally the authors themselves – thank you for taking us on your journeys.

 

Until next year,

Julianne Mooney
Programme Director