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DBF-2014-Authors-811x150-DonalRyan
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DBF-2014-Authors-811x150-PeterMurphy

DBF Interviews: Darren Kelly

by Admin on November 1, 2015

1916 Walking Tour – The Battles of the Easter Rising with Darren Kelly and Derek Molyneux. Here, Darren tells us what people can expect.

 

Q: When the Clock Struck in 1916 – Close-Quarter Combat in the Easter Rising, the book co-authored by yourself and Derek Molyneux, is the background upon which you base the walking tour you’ll be giving at #DBF2015, but did you always have it in mind to bring to life for people the events of the Rising?

There had been an idea to do walking tours which began when a lot of interest was shown in our Facebook page ‘Dublin 1916 then & now’. But this was put on hold when we decided to write ‘When the Clock Stuck in 1916’. We now have had a great opportunity to work and are still working with Marcus Howard of Easter Rising Stories producing video documentary’s for the different areas where fighting occurred during the rising. Also I think there are already some great tours out there, Lorcan Collins and the 1916 Rebellion walking tour to name but one. We have started work on the second book and are doing various other pieces about the rising outside of Dublin. But saying that it is not out of the question for walking tours in the future.

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DBF Interviews: Sarah Davis-Goff (Tramp Press)

by Admin on October 30, 2015

DBF-Events-100x150-8Ahead of the launch of the second title in their Recovered Voices series, we talked to Sarah Davis-Goff from Tramp Press about how the series came about.

 

Q: The Uninvited by Dorothy Macardle is the second title in Tramp Press’ Recovered Voices series. Can you give us a brief description of how the series came about and what it aims to achieve?

The Recovered Voices series is a bit like a Search & Rescue mission for literature. We spend all year looking for and reading wonderful works that people haven’t heard of to bring fresh to readers. It’s really fun, actually: lots of people email us to suggest titles that they’d love to see back in print, and it’s like a treasure hunt.

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DBF Interviews: Kate Dempsey

by Admin on October 29, 2015

Kate DempseyHennessy shortlistFebruary 2006Pic: Mark CondrenKate Dempsey tells us all about her debut poetry collection, The Space Between (Doire Press), and being one of the Poetry Divas. Kate will appear as part of our RTÉ Radio 1 Arena Live Show.

 

Q: How long have you been writing and was it always poetry towards which you were drawn?

I started writing as a New Year’s resolution for 1999 and haven’t stopped. After struggling on my own for a while with stories, I joined an evening class in Lucan where the writer Stuart Lane, led us, not always gently, into the unchartered territory of character creation, plays and poetry.

So I have had some fiction and non-fiction published and broadcast on RTE Radio. I also had a short play performed by Red Kettle theatre at the Waterford Royal Theatre. A couple of years ago I had a piece of satire included in the “New Planet Cabaret” Anthology that started on RTE Arena but in the last few years, 95% of my writing has been poetry.

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DBF Interviews: Nuala Ní Chonchúir

by Admin on October 28, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 15.25.16Nuala Ní Chonchúir tells us about her journey to becoming a novelist and what the future holds. Nuala will be a panellist at our Writing Long & Short event on Saturday, 14 November.

 

Q: You’ve published numerous poetry and short story collections and, in more recent times, novels. Is it a conscious decision on your part to move towards the longer form or has it just been a natural progression? 

I actually wrote my first novel seven years before it was published (by New Island in 2010) and I have another one that was never published, so I have been writing novels all along. The progression to publishing is not always smooth or predictable. I was happy to write stories and poems alongside longer work and the order of publication has only been the luck of the draw.

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DBF Interviews: Lisa McInerney

by Admin on October 27, 2015

lisa McInerneyWe talked to Lisa McInerney about her debut novel, The Glorious Heresies (John Murray), and her appearance in The Long Gaze Back (New Island Books) anthology. Lisa will be joined by Anne Enright, Sinéad Gleeson, Christine Dwyer Hickey and Madeleine Keane to discuss and read from the anthology.

 

Q: Earlier this year you published your debut novel, The Glorious Heresies (John Murray), which deals with issues such as family, shame, redemption and sex, especially in relation to Ireland’s twentieth century attitudes to those things – do you feel we’re beginning to move on somewhat from the hangover of those times? In particular, does writing about them in fiction help address those issues on a personal level more satisfactorily than your blog, Arse End of Ireland, did? Or was there any difference?

I definitely feel that those oppressive attitudes are changing, and for the better.There’s a real sense of liberal empathy becoming part of our national identity, especially since the marriage referendum. It’s overdue but worth celebrating. But I don’t think writing about the more intolerant attitudes of our recent history was all that provoking on a personal level; it’s simply that it’d be ridiculous to write a contemporary Irish novel with a cast of characters who would all have been naturally shaped by Ireland’s attitudes to sex and to family without referencing those attitudes. On that basis I think the thematic content of Heresies was very close to that of the old blog: if you’re going to look that closely at Ireland’s psyche, it’ll keep you sane if you’re irreverent about it.

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DBF Interviews: Aidan Mathews

by Admin on October 27, 2015

aidanmathewsAhead of his appearance at our Writing Long & Short event Aidan Mathews, poet, playwright and novelist, gives us a brief insight into his views on writing.

 

Q: Charlie Chaplin’s Wishbone and Other Stories (The Lilliput Press) is your first new collection in a long time – how long have you been working on it?

There’s one story in the suite that was written not only in the last century, but in the last millennium. Serving one’s sentences is a life-term.

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DBF Interviews: Harry Clifton

by Admin on October 22, 2015

harry-cliftonHarry Clifton talks to us about his time as Ireland Chair of Poetry. He will appear alongside former and current Ireland Chairs of Poetry, Michael Longley and Paula Meehan, in conversation with Arminta Wallace at our The Poet’s Chair event.

 

 

Q: You’ve had an extensive career as a poet, publishing numerous collections – did your time as Ireland Professor of Poetry help you discover anything new or unexpected?

You are always hoping to connect with the young. I found that the most gratifying from a human angle – their anxiety to be part of a small group around a table reading and discussing poetry, actually, physically present, with the extraneous technology excluded for once. The attraction, if you like, of the single hesitant human voice in a world of button-pressing reproducibility.
I made it clear in my public lectures that they were aimed, over the heads of the cognoscenti and the academics, at the young who would carry on the discourse and the argument into a new era. And gratifyingly, after the death of Seamus Heaney, many young people got back to me to say how much they had connected with that.

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DBF Interviews: Niall MacMonagle

by Admin on October 21, 2015

DBF-Events-100x150-24Niall MacMonagle, editor of Windharp: Poems of Ireland Since 1916, talked to us about what inspired the collection, the public’s reaction to it, and his hopes for its future. In association with Poetry Ireland we will host a special evening of selected readings from the anthology.

 

 

Q: In an article in The Irish Times you said that Windharp: Poems of Ireland Since 1916 – the anthology you’ve just edited – began without you knowing it in 1988. When did you first give serious thought to the idea of compiling and publishing this ambitious collection? Was it always your wish for it to mark the centenary of 1916?

From very early on every Irish person has 1916 imprinted on their consciousness. The Rising set in motion a journey that is still ongoing today. I’ve always been intrigued by Pearse’s ‘The Wayfarer’ written just hours before he was executed at 3.30 am on 3 May 1916. And John Montague, who taught us in UCC in the early ’70s, his ‘Windharp’ I’ve always loved. I pinned it above the sink during a year spent in Cambridge, Massachusetts and it summoned up and still does an empty and wildly beautiful Irish landscape. But the idea for the anthology came to me in 2012 and poetry tells a wonderful story, more lasting than the newspaper and Ireland’s complex history is also found in its poetry.

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Peter Murphy

by Admin on October 8, 2015

Peter Murphy, photo by Graham KeoghPeter Murphy is a writer and performer from Wexford, Ireland. His novels include John the Revelator (2009) and Shall We Gather at the River (2013). He has released two albums with the spoken word/music ensemble The Revelator Orchestra: The Sounds of John the Revelator (2012) and The Brotherhood of the Flood (2014). His non-fiction has appeared in Rolling Stone, The Irish Times, The Guardian, Huffington Post and other publications. He is currently at work on his third book.

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Claire Kilroy

by Admin on October 8, 2015

Claire_Kilroy_author_photoClaire Kilroy is the author of four novels, All Summer (Faber & Faber, 2003), Tenderwire (Faber & Faber, 2006), All Names Have Been Changed (Faber & Faber, 2009), and The Devil I Know (Faber & Faber, 2012), which was described by The Guardian as “a satiric dance macabre of brio and linguistic virtuosity,” and by the New York Times as “savagely comic… and great fun.” It was a Boston Globe choice in their Best Fiction of 2014. Claire has been shortlisted for the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year three times, and was awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature in 2004. She is the 2015 Heimbold Chair of Irish Studies at Villanova University.

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